Krebs Cycle

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(1)FIRST FROM "KHAN ACADEMY" <------- MY FAVE



(2) MCSTJMROSS <---- A BIOLOGY TEACHER I FOUND OF YOUTUBE...SHE'S AWESOME




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CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE.  source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citric_acid_cycle



IMPORTANT KEY WORDS:

The citric acid cycle — also known as the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle), the Krebs cycle, or recently in certain former Soviet Bloc countries the Szent-Györgyi-Krebs cycle[1][2] — is a series of enzyme-catalysed chemical reactions, which is of central importance in all living cells, especially those that use oxygen as part of cellular respiration. In eukaryotic cells, the citric acid cycle occurs in the matrix of the mitochondrion. The components and reactions of the citric acid cycle were established by discovery of Vitamin C by Hungarian[3] Nobel laureate Albert Szent-Györgyi and continued on to its complex metabolism into energy and metabolites by Nobel laureate Hans Adolf Krebs, a German born, Jewish refugee to Britain.[4]
In aerobic organisms, the citric acid cycle is part of a metabolic pathway involved in the chemical conversion of carbohydrates, fats and proteins into carbon dioxide and water to generate a form of usable energy. Other relevant reactions in the pathway include those in glycolysis and pyruvate oxidation before the citric acid cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation after it. In addition, it provides precursors for many compounds including some amino acids and is therefore functional even in cells performing fermentation. Its centrality to many paths of biosynthesis suggest that it was one of the earliest formed parts of the cellular metabolic processes, and may have formed abiogenically.[5]
source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krebs_cycle
Adenosine diphosphate, abbreviated ADP, is a nucleotide. It is an ester of pyrophosphoric acid with the nucleoside adenosine. ADP consists of the pyrophosphate group, the pentose sugar ribose, and the nucleobase adenine.
ADP is the product of ATP dephosphorylation by ATPases. ADP is converted back to ATP by ATP synthases. ATP is an important energy transfer molecule in cells.
ADP is stored in dense bodies inside blood platelets and is released upon platelet activation. ADP interacts with a family of ADP receptors found on platelets (P2Y1, P2Y12 and P2X1), leading to further platelet activation.[1] ADP in the blood is converted to adenosine by the action of ecto-ADPases, inhibiting further platelet activation via adenosine receptors.
ADP is the end-product that results when ATP loses one of its phosphate groups located at the end of the molecule.[2] The conversion of these two molecules plays a critical role in supplying energy for many processes of life.[2] The deletion of one of ATP’s phosphorus bonds generates approximately 7.3 kilocalories per Mole of ATP.[3] ADP can be converted, or powered back to ATP through the process of releasing the chemical energy available in food; in humans this is constantly performed via aerobic respiration in the mitochondria.[2] Plants use photosynthetic pathways to convert and store the energy from sunlight, via conversion of ADP to ATP.[3] Animals use the energy released in the breakdown of glucose and other molecules to convert ADP to ATP, which can then be used to fuel necessary growth and cell maintenance.[2] Recently, Atul Kumar for the first time demonstrated that single nucleotides (ADP}have the ability to catalyze organic reactions, and performed Biomimetic reductive amination, which is considered as one of the most genuine biomimetic reactions of organic chemistry. This single-nucleotide catalysis has immense impact on many fields of science such as chemistry, biochemistry, and prebiotic studies, especially the RNA world and DNA world hypothesis for understanding the origin of life on Earth.[4]

source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adenosine_diphosphate

Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is a multifunctional nucleotide used in cells as a coenzyme. It is often called the "molecular unit of currency" of intracellular energy transfer.[1] ATP transports chemical energy within cells for metabolism. It is produced by photophosphorylation and cellular respiration and used by enzymes and structural proteins in many cellular processes, including biosynthetic reactions, motility, and cell division.[2] One molecule of ATP contains three phosphate groups, and it is produced by ATP synthase from inorganic phosphate and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) or adenosine monophosphate (AMP).
Metabolic processes that use ATP as an energy source convert it back into its precursors. ATP is therefore continuously recycled in organisms: the human body, which on average contains only 250 grams (8.8 oz) of ATP,[3] turns over its own body weight in ATP each day.[4]
ATP is used as a substrate in signal transduction pathways by kinases that phosphorylate proteins and lipids, as well as by adenylate cyclase, which uses ATP to produce the second messenger molecule cyclic AMP. The ratio between ATP and AMP is used as a way for a cell to sense how much energy is available and control the metabolic pathways that produce and consume ATP.[5] Apart from its roles in energy metabolism and signaling, ATP is also incorporated into nucleic acids by polymerases in the processes of DNA replication and transcription.
The structure of this molecule consists of a purine base (adenine) attached to the 1' carbon atom of a pentose sugar (ribose). Three phosphate groups are attached at the 5' carbon atom of the pentose sugar. It is the addition and removal of these phosphate groups that inter-convert ATP, ADP and AMP. When ATP is used in DNA synthesis, the ribose sugar is first converted to deoxyribose by ribonucleotide reductase.
ATP was discovered in 1929 by Karl Lohmann,[6] but its correct structure was not determined until some years later. It was proposed to be the main energy-transfer molecule in the cell by Fritz Albert Lipmann in 1941.[7] It was first artificially synthesized by Alexander Todd in 1948.[8]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adenosine_triphosphate

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, abbreviated NAD+, is a coenzyme found in all living cells. The compound is a dinucleotide, since it consists of two nucleotides joined through their phosphate groups, with one nucleotide containing an adenine base and the other containing nicotinamide.
In metabolism, NAD+ is involved in redox reactions, carrying electrons from one reaction to another. The coenzyme is, therefore, found in two forms in cells: NAD+ is an oxidizing agent – it accepts electrons from other molecules and becomes reduced. This reaction forms NADH, which can then be used as a reducing agent to donate electrons. These electron transfer reactions are the main function of NAD+. However, it is also used in other cellular processes, the most notable one being a substrate of enzymes that add or remove chemical groups from proteins, in posttranslational modifications. Because of the importance of these functions, the enzymes involved in NAD+ metabolism are targets for drug discovery.
In organisms, NAD+ can be synthesized from simple building-blocks (de novo) from the amino acids tryptophan or aspartic acid. In an alternative fashion, more complex components of the coenzymes are taken up from food as the vitamin called niacin. Similar compounds are released by reactions that break down the structure of NAD+. These preformed components then pass through a salvage pathway that recycles them back into the active form. Some NAD+ is also converted into nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+); the chemistry of this related coenzyme is similar to that of NAD+, but it has different roles in metabolism.
source; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicotinamide_adenine_dinucleotide

Pyruvic acid (CH3COCOOH) is an organic acid, a ketone, as well as the simplest of the alpha-keto acids. The carboxylate (COOH) ion (anion) of pyruvic acid, CH3COCOO, is known as pyruvate, and is a key intersection in several metabolic pathways.
It can be made from glucose through glycolysis, converted back to carbohydrates (such as glucose) via gluconeogenesis, or to fatty acids through acetyl-CoA. It can also be used to construct the amino acid alanine and be converted into ethanol.
It supplies energy to living cells through the citric acid cycle (also known as the Krebs cycle) when oxygen is present (aerobic respiration), and alternatively ferments to produce lactate when oxygen is lacking (fermentation).
source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyruvate

Acetyl coenzyme A or acetyl-CoA is an important molecule in metabolism, used in many biochemical reactions. Its main function is to convey the carbon atoms within the acetyl group to the citric acid cycle to be oxidized for energy production. In chemical structure, acetyl-CoA is the thioester between coenzyme A (a thiol) and acetic acid (an acyl group carrier). Acetyl-CoA is produced during the second step of aerobic cellular respiration, pyruvate decarboxylation, which occurs in the matrix of the mitochondria. Acetyl-CoA then enters the citric acid cycle.
Acetyl-CoA is also an important component in the biogenic synthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Choline, in combination with acetyl-CoA, is catalyzed by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase to produce acetylcholine and a coenzyme a byproduct.
source; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acetyl-CoA

MY BULLETS POINTS USING PEARSON EDUCATION: GLYCOLYSIS TO KREBS CYCLE:
  1. GLYCOLYSIS
    1. OXIDATION OF GLUCOSE  TO PYRUVIC ACID
    2. PRODUCTION: 2 NADH
  2. PREPARATORY STEP:
    1. FORMATION OF ACETYL-CoA
      1. PRODUCES: 2 NADH
  3. KREBS CYCLE
    1. OXIDATION OF SUCCINYL CoA TO SUCCINIC ACID
    2. PRODUCTION: 6 NADH
    3. PRODUCTION: 2 FADH

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